Women’s Studies

Fresh Courage Take

Fresh-Courage-Take
The twelve essays in this anthology provide a refreshing array of female perspectives, personalities, and circumstances. Along with an introduction by Jamie Zvirzdin, the essays invite readers to recognize and own their personal struggles, gifts, faults, and desires and to accept where they stand on the spectrum of humanity. Fresh Courage Take demonstrates that the road to heaven is not a conveyor belt powered by a checklist of religious...

Midwife

midwife
Born in rural Idaho in the 1930s, her family moved to Bountiful, Utah, and then Salt Lake City in the late 1930s and mid-1940s. She and her sister married a son of a Mormon fundamentalist leader. In this captivating biography, we learn of her struggle as a teenager to obtain a college education and to succeed as a nurse only to become one of the most sought after midwives...

Pedestals & Podiums

Utah Women, Religious Authority, and Equal Rights
Conjuring up images of unisex bathrooms, homosexuality, the dangers of women in the military, and the divine calling of stay-at-home motherhood—none of which were directly related to equal rights—the LDS campaign began in Utah at church headquarters but importantly was fought across the country in states that had not yet ratified the proposed amendment.

Mormon Polygamy

Mormon Polygamy: A History
In this comprehensive survey of Mormon Polygamy, Richard Van Wagoner details, with precision and detachment, the tumultuous reaction among insiders and outsiders to plural marriage. In an honest, methodical way, he traces the origins, the peculiarities common to the midwestern and later Utah periods, and post-1890 new marriages. Drawing heavily on first-hand accounts, he outlines the theological underpinnings and the personal trauma associated with this lifestyle.

In Sacred Loneliness

The Plural Wives of Joseph Smith
The majority of Smith's wives were younger than he, and one-third were between fourteen and twenty years of age. Another third were already married, and some of the husbands served as witnesses at their own wife's polyandrous wedding. In addition, some of the wives hinted that they bore Smith children—most notably Sylvia Sessions's daughter Josephine—although the children carried their stepfather's surname.