Mormon News, November 10–14

In the News

LDS CHURCH TO ALLOW DIVORCED MEMBERS AND YOUNG MOTHERS TO TEACH SEMINARY
Historically, divorced individuals and mothers with young children in the LDS Church have been prohibited from teaching seminary, the church’s extracurricular program for high school students. Even existing seminary teachers would 47lose their jobs after a divorce. Now, a rule change from the church allows young mothers and divorced individuals to be hired or stay on as teachers in the Church Educational System (CES). Mothers with young children and divorced members were also unable to be hired to teach college-level institute or hold other positions throughout CES.

POLYGAMY ESSAYS GET WORLDWIDE ATTENTION
Although the LDS Church posted essays discussing the faith’s practice of polygamy some three weeks ago, a New York Times report on Joseph Smith’s plural marriages catapulted the acknowledgement worldwide. Although Smith’s polygamy has been accepted knowledge among Mormon historians and scholars for decades, the essays make it, in the words of the Times, “official.” The story was widely covered in the United States and Europe, and was even reported on by popular television news programs such as PBS NewsHour (with Dialogue editor Kristine Haglund) and Lawrence O’Donnell’s The Last Word (with historian Richard Bushman) on MSNBC.

UTAH ELECTS FIRST REPUBLICAN AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMAN TO CONGRESS
Mia Love, Utah’s new Congressional representative, has garnered more attention than most of the nation’s newly minted politicians. That’s because Love’s identity is a headline that contradicts stereotypes. She’s a black Republican Latter-day Saint woman from the deeply conservative state of Utah. Her story has been featured on CNN and in print media across the country. Love, a conservative Tea Party style candidate, has largely downplayed her race and has said Utah does not care what someone’s skin color is.

On the Blogs

John G. Turner, guest-blogging at By Common Consent, writes that the famous Lorenzo Snow couplet, “As man is, God once was. As God is, man may be,” might have originated with Brigham Young. Turner, author of the well-received biography, Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet, cites an 1849 speech of Young’s where he expresses the same couplet. This speech, originally recorded by Robert Campbell and Thomas Bullock, appears in the Complete Discourses of Brigham Young, vol. 1, edited by Richard S. Van Wagoner. Now available on Kindle.

News update by John Hatch, acquisitions editor