Dream House on Golan Drive

Dream-House-on-Golan-Drive

This novel is set in Provo, Utah and New York City during the seventies and eighties, the story encapsulates the normal expectations of a Mormon experience and turns them on their head. The style, too, is innovative in how it employs as narrator “Zed,” one of the apocryphal Three Nephites who, with another immortal figure, the Wandering Jew of post-biblical legend, engage regularly in light-hearted banter and running commentary, animating the story and leavening the heartache with humor and tenderness.

“Don’t expect to read this book unscathed or untouched.” –Catherine C. Peterson, Association of Mormon Letters


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Latest News

February 5th, 2016

Mormon News, February 1–5

The LDS Church reposted its policy for handling child sexual abuse online this week, calling it a “gold standard” and touting their record in preventing abuse. The policy, first written in 2010, immediately generated some angry online responses as members shared first-hand experiences, including details of harrowing abuse, that directly refuted some of the claims in the church’s post. The statement that “preventing and responding to child abuse is the subject of a regular lesson taught during Sunday meetings,” especially baffled some members who say they have gone their whole lives without receiving such instruction. The policy may have been reposted in response to a report of high abuse rates in Utah, as well as questions about how the...

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January 29th, 2016

Mormon News, January 25–29

Wendy Williams Montgomery, an advocate for LGBT Mormon youth, reported this week that as many as thirty-four Latter-day Saints, between ages fourteen and twenty, had committed suicide since November. The suicides come on the heels of a fiercely debated policy change barring children of gay parents from baptism and labeling gay couples as apostates. Peggy Fletcher Stack, reporting for the Salt Lake Tribune, struggled to confirm Montgomery’s figures and wrote of the challenges in pinpointing causes of suicide. But she also included stories from Mormons who say family members struggled with depression following the policy change and ultimately took their own lives. The LDS Church responded to the reports saying that “we mourn with their families and friends when...

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